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Tatyana Klyachko 1,2, Elena Semionova 3, Galina Tokareva 3
  • 1 National Research University Higher School of Economics, 20 Myasnitskaya Str., Moscow, 101000, Russian Federation
  • 2 Center for Continuing Education Economics, Institute for Social Analysis and Forecasting, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, 82, Vernadskogo pr., 119571, Moscow, Russian Federation
  • 3 Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, 82 Vernadskogo Ave, 119571 Moscow, Russian Federation

Success and Failure of School Students: Parental Expectations and Teachers’ Perceptions

2019. No. 4. P. 71–92 [issue contents]

Tatiana Klyachko – Doctor of Sciences in Economics, Director of the Center for Lifelong Learning Economics. E-mail: tlk@ranepa.ru.

Elena Semionova – Candidate of Sciences in Economics, Leading Researcher. E-mail: semionova-ea@ranepa.ru.

Galina Tokareva – Research Fellow. E-mail: tokareva-gs@ranepa.ru.

Center for Lifelong Learning Economics, Institute of Applied Economic Research, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, Federal State Budgetary Educational Institution of Higher Education.

Address: 82 Vernadskogo Ave, 119571 Moscow, Russian Federation.

The article presents the results of RANEPA Center for Lifelong Learning Economics’ Monitoring of Efficiency of School Education concerning teachers’ and parents’ perceptions of student achievement. The study involved analysis of official statistics and data from sociological surveys of parents, teachers, and school administrators across different types of communities structured by the level of socioeconomic development.

The fact that student achievement is largely contingent on teacher expertise is beyond dispute. It turns out, however, that teachers also attribute poor student performance to low parental involvement, socioeconomic disadvantage, health issues, and irresponsible student behavior. According to teachers, the proportion of students unable to cope with the curriculum increases consistently from grade to grade, peaking in Grades 8 and 9. Better student performance in Grades 10–11 (high school) may be explained by withdrawal of some students after completing the middle school level.

Most parents perceive their children’s academic performance to be above average. At the same time, along with teachers, parents report a decline in student achievement in middle school. Families attribute this downswing in performance to various factors, including lack of subject-specific abilities, challenging curricula, and decline in student engagement. Only 9.3% of parents consider teaching quality to be a factor of low student performance. Lower average family income is associated with higher frequency of reporting low child performance at school. The influence of family income on student achievement may be explained, in particular, by differences in the opportunity to buy extra tuition, including private tutoring.

Citation: Klyachko T., Semionova E., Tokareva G. (2019) Uspeshnost' i neuspeshnost' shkol'nikov: ozhidaniya roditeley, otsenka uchiteley [Success and Failure of School Students: Parental Expectations and Teachers’ Perceptions]. Voprosy obrazovaniya / Educational Studies Moscow, no4, pp. 71-92.
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